Cultural Resources

Cultural resources is a broad term that encompasses all the physical evidence of past human activity.  This could include things such as a: site, object, structure, or landscape. Cultural resources are non-renewable resources that are important to our nations history as they tell the story of our human past and our interaction with the natural environment. 

FSA is actively developing its historic preservation (cultural resources) program. Focus is on creatively meeting the requirements of the law and regulations while also attempting to streamline day-to-day compliance and protection of cultural resources. FSA fulfills its historic preservation responsibilities through compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.


Section 106

Section 106 requires all Federal agencies, including FSA, to take into account the impacts of their planned actions on historic properties. Historic properties are those cultural resources deemed as significant to the history of the United States and those peoples who lived here prior to the founding of our country.

Section 106 also requires that FSA consult with other parties when examining their project's impacts. FSA takes historic properties into account prior to approving any application or contract. FSA's handbook, 1-EQ, provides detailed guidance for state and county offices on how to apply the Section 106 review and consultation process.

Tribal

Consulting with tribes is an important component of the historic preservation program. FSA is working to improve the way it consults with federally recognized Indian tribes. Consultation with tribes takes place at both the state and National level.


State Office Contacts:

FSA State Offices

National Office Contact:

Bennett Horter
Federal Preservation Officer
Farm Production and Conservation Business Center, Environmental Activities Division
U.S. Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Ave., SW
Mail Stop 0563
Washington, DC 20250
202-690-1164


Related Links

Cultural Resources
Tribal