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Arizona State Office

State Executive Director

Ginger Sykes Torres

Ginger Sykes Torres

Read Ginger Sykes Torres'

State Office Address

230 N. 1st Avenue
Suite 506
Phoenix, Arizona 85003-1726
(602) 285-6300
(855) 220-1760

Welcome to the Arizona Farm Service Agency Home Page

Our primary mission is to help ensure the success of Arizona’s farmers and ranchers through various programs and technical assistance. The work that FSA continues to accomplish day to day is important not only to the agricultural producers around the State but also to the rural communities that depend on the agricultural industry.

The hard-working men and women of Arizona's county offices are at the forefront of our efforts and remain the primary contact for program participation. We encourage you to speak with the staff at your local FSA office on how we can be of service. Our website can help you learn more about FSA programs and services.



Biden-Harris Administration Announces $3.1 Billion Investment for Climate-Smart Agriculture and Support for Underserved Farmers and Ranchers

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today that the Biden-Harris Administration, through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing an additional $325 million for 71 projects under the second funding pool of the Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities effort, bringing the total investment from both funding pools to over $3.1 billion for 141 tentatively selected projects. Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities is working to expand markets for American producers, especially small and underserved producers, who have the most to gain from growing market demand for climate-smart commodities.  Learn More: <link to USDA Press Release>


Pandemic Assistance


USDA Temporarily Suspends Debt Collections, Foreclosures and Other Activities on Farm Loans

Due to the national public health emergency caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced the temporary suspension of past-due debt collections and foreclosures for distressed borrowers under the Farm Storage Facility Loan and the Direct Farm Loan programs administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA). USDA will temporarily suspend non-judicial foreclosures, debt offsets or wage garnishments, and referring foreclosures to the Department of Justice; and USDA will work with the U.S. Attorney’s Office to stop judicial foreclosures and evictions on accounts that were previously referred to the Department of Justice. Additionally, USDA has extended deadlines for producers to respond to loan servicing actions, including loan deferral consideration for financially distressed and delinquent borrowers. In addition, for the Guaranteed Loan program, flexibilities have been made available to lenders to assist in servicing their customers. For more information, contact your local Farm Service Agency Office.

Farmers Can Now Make 2023 Crop Year Elections, Enroll in Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage Programs 

Agricultural producers can now change election and enroll in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage programs for the 2023 crop year, two key safety net programs offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Signup began Oct. 17, 2022, and producers have until March 15, 2023, to enroll in these two programs. Additionally, USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) has started issuing payments totaling more than $255 million to producers with 2021 crops that have triggered payments through ARC or PLC.  

2023 Elections and Enrollment   

Producers can elect coverage and enroll in ARC-County (ARC-CO) or PLC, which provide crop-by-crop protection, or ARC-Individual (ARC-IC), which protects the entire farm. Although election changes for 2023 are optional, producers must enroll through a signed contract each year. Also, if a producer has a multi-year contract on the farm and makes an election change for 2023, they must sign a new contract.    

If producers do not submit their election by the March 15, 2023 deadline, their election remains the same as their 2022 election for crops on the farm.  Farm owners cannot enroll in either program unless they have a share interest in the farm.     

Covered commodities include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium and short grain rice, safflower seed, seed cotton, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat.    

Web-Based Decision Tools   

In partnership with USDA, the University of Illinois and Texas A&M University offer web-based decision tools to assist producers in making informed, educated decisions using crop data specific to their respective farming operations. Tools include:   

·        Gardner-farmdoc Payment Calculator, a tool available through the University of Illinois allows producers to estimate payments for farms and counties for ARC-CO and PLC.  

·        ARC and PLC Decision Tool, a tool available through Texas A&M that allows producers to obtain basic information regarding the decision and factors that should be taken into consideration such as future commodity prices and historic yields to estimate payments for 2022.   

2021 Payments and Contracts  

ARC and PLC payments for a given crop year are paid out the following fall to allow actual county yields and the Market Year Average prices to be finalized. This month, FSA processed payments to producers enrolled in 2021 ARC-CO, ARC-IC and PLC for covered commodities that triggered for the crop year.   

For ARC-CO, producers can view the 2021 ARC-CO Benchmark Yields and Revenues online database, for payment rates applicable to their county and each covered commodity. For PLC, payments have triggered for rapeseed and peanuts. 

For ARC-IC, producers should contact their local FSA office for additional information pertaining to 2021 payment information, which relies on producer-specific yields for the crop and farm to determine benchmark yields and actual year yields when calculating revenues.  

By the Numbers  

In 2021, producers signed nearly 1.8 million ARC or PLC contracts, and 251 million out of 273 million base acres were enrolled in the programs.  For the 2022 crop year signed contracts surpassed 1.8 million, to be paid in the fall of 2023, if a payment triggers. 

Since ARC and PLC were first authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and reauthorized by the 2018 Farm Bill, these safety-net programs have paid out more than $34.9 billion to producers of covered commodities.  

Crop Insurance Considerations   

ARC and PLC are part of a broader safety net provided by USDA, which also includes crop insurance and marketing assistance loans.   

Producers are reminded that ARC and PLC elections and enrollments can impact eligibility for some crop insurance products.   

Producers on farms with a PLC election have the option of purchasing Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO) through their Approved Insurance Provider; however, producers on farms where ARC is the election are ineligible for SCO on their planted acres for that crop on that farm.   

Unlike SCO, the Enhanced Coverage Option (ECO) is unaffected by an ARC election.  Producers may add ECO regardless of the farm program election.  

Upland cotton farmers who choose to enroll seed cotton base acres in ARC or PLC are ineligible for the stacked income protection plan (STAX) on their planted cotton acres for that farm.    

More Information    

For more information on ARC and PLC, visit the ARC and PLC webpage or contact your local USDA Service Center


USDA to Provide Approximately $6 Billion to Commodity and Specialty Crop Producers Impacted by 2020 and 2021 Natural Disasters 

The U. S Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced that commodity and specialty crop producers impacted by natural disaster events in 2020 and 2021 will soon begin receiving emergency relief payments totaling approximately $6 billion through the Farm Service Agency’s (FSA) new Emergency Relief Program (ERP) to offset crop yield and value losses. 


Are you a New/Beginning Farmer?

USDA Service Centers across the country, are hearing from people who are interested in more space and working the land and we want to let you know we can help. Are you new to farming because of the pandemic? USDA can help you get started in farming – on everything from helping you register your farm to getting financial assistance and advice.   

Get Started with USDA

First, you want to make sure your farm is registered. If you purchased land, it might already be established with USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) with a farm number on file. If not, FSA can help you register your farm.

To obtain a farm number, you’ll bring an official tax ID (Social Security number or an employer ID) and a property deed. If you do not own the land, bring a lease agreement to your FSA representative to show you have control of the property. If your operation is incorporated or an entity, you may also need to provide proof that you have signature authority and the legal ability to enter into contracts with USDA.  

Access to Capital

USDA can provide access to capital through its farm loans, which is a great resource when producers aren’t able to get a loan from a traditional lender. Loans can help with purchasing land or equipment or with operating costs, and FSA even offers microloans, which are especially popular among producers with smaller farms. For more information, check out our Farm Loan Discovery Tool.

Conservation Practices

We can help you make conservation improvements to your farm, which are good for your bottom line and your operation. We’ll help you develop a conservation plan and apply for financial assistance that’ll cover the bulk of the costs for implementing. To learn more about some of the conservation practices that we help producers with, check out our Conservation at Work Video Series.

If you purchase land, and you don’t want to farm all of it, you can look at either a conservation easement or managing for native shrubs and grasses through either the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Easements are long-term, while a CRP contract is 10-15 years. These are good options for land that is not optimal for production or sensitive lands like wetlands and grasslands.

Additional Resources

Depending on your farm, you may want to look at crop insurance. The USDA’s Risk Management Agency provides crop insurance to help you manage risks on your farm. There are many types of insurance products available for a wide variety of production practices, including organic and sustainable agriculture.

Your local communities also have great resources for farmers including conservation districts, Rural Development, cooperative extensions, and different farming groups. To get started with USDA, contact your local USDA service center.  We encourage you to check the status of your local USDA Service Center and make an appointment to discuss your business needs.


Program Information

Upcoming Signup Deadlines:

Jan 30 - ELAP applications deadline

Jan 31 - 2023 Dairy Margin Coverage Deadline


NAP Application Closing Dates:

May 1    Cauliflower, Carrots, Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Nursery

Crop Reporting Dates:

March 15          Pecans, Pistachios, Potatoes, Small Grains, Dry Peas (La Paz,

                       Maricopa, and Pinal counties only)

July 15             All other crops, Perennial Forage

July 31             Hemp

August 15         Grain Sorghum, Pinto Beans

For more information about USDA programs and to find your local service center please contact your local USDA Service Center. or visit our website at: www.farmers.gov.


About the Farm Service Agency

The Farm Service Agency is a federal agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Located in all 50 states, our mission is to help American farmers provide reasonably priced food and fiber to the nation and the world.

The Arizona State Office is located in Phoenix, Arizona. County Service Centers are located in eight Arizona communities to serve the needs of area farmers and ranchers. Click the link below for County Office phone numbers and addresses: HERE

The Farm Service Agency State Committee in Arizona oversees the activities of the agency. The members are appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture each year. They hear appeals from local farmers and guide the direction of agency policy.

Arizona State Committee: William K. Perry - Acting


Sign Up Now: Instant Electronic Bulletins & SMS Texting

GovDelivery is a free email service that enables FSA County Offices to send you bulletins, deadline reminders and newsletters instantly. Sign up now to receive information faster and reduce printing and mailing costs. To sign up use the email box “Sign up for updates:" on the right column of this page. Subscribe to text message alerts to receive timely updates on: deadline reminders, program notifications, reporting requirements, local outreach events. To subscribe to text message alerts, text AZ and COUNTY NAME to FSANOW (372-669). Standard text messaging rates apply. Participants may unsubscribe at any time. No more than two reminder messages will be sent each month on average. GovDelivery is your one-stop shop for the most up-to-date USDA program information.


FSA Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Resources

It is FSA's policy to provide equal opportunity in all programs, services, and activities to LEP persons. 

Limited English Proficiency (LEP) persons are individuals who do not speak English as their primary language and who have a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English. As directed in Executive Order 13166 " Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency", LEP statutes and authorities prohibit exclusion from participation in, denial of benefits of, and discrimination under federally assisted and/or conducted programs on the ground of race, color, or national origin.

FSA offers three types of language translation and interpretation services available to customers at no cost:  (1) document translation; (2) telephonic interpretation; and (3) in-person interpretation. These language translation and interpretation services will assist both customers and staff with overcoming language barriers.

iSpeak posters are displayed in each office to identify the language need to the county office staff.

For more information, visit farmers.gov/translations

Please contact your local county office. To find the office closest to you, visit http://offices.usda.gov.