"Grassroots" Source Water Protection Program

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Https

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

"Grassroots" Source Water Protection Program

What is the Source Water Protection Program (SWPP)?

source_water_protex

The Source Water Protection Program (SWPP) is a joint project with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the National Rural Water Association (NRWA), a non-profit water and wastewater utility membership organization. The SWPP is designed to help prevent pollution of surface and ground water used as the primary source of drinking water by rural residents.


How does SWPP work?

Through NRWA, full-time rural source water technicians with practical experience are hired. The technicians work with specialists from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and state and county FSA staff, to identify areas where pollution prevention is most needed. Once areas for pollution prevention are identified, technicians work with state rural water associations to create local teams made up of citizens and individuals from federal, state, local, and private organizations. These teams collaborate to create a Rural Source Water Protection plan to promote clean source water. The plan identifies voluntary actions that farmers and ranchers can install to prevent source water pollution.


Why is SWPP important? 

Clean drinking water is critical. The SWPP works at a grassroots level to educate and inform rural residents about steps they can take to prevent water pollution and improve water quality. Most importantly, it is the local community that helps create the water protection plan and is invested in its success.

For more information on enrollment, eligibility, and land requirements, please scroll down to the Participant Information section on the page.


For a list of FAQs, visit Ask USDA.

Producers in participating states are encouraged to take part in SWPP by using suggested conservation practices and becoming a member of the local team responsible for developing the SWPP. 

For further information about the program, visit your local FSA office